News & Announcements

  • featured post

    School Spirit Wednesday’s will begin on 2/24 (and every Wednesday for the rest of the school year)

    Please see the list of themes below. We’d love to see everyone participate regardless of grade level and learning preference (blended, remote)!

    2/24: Pajama Day

    Come to school comfy and cozy.

    3/3: Character Day

    In honor of Read Across America week, dress up like your favorite character. 

    3/10: Sports Day

    Support your favorite team by wearing their jersey or colors.

    3/17: St. Patrick's Day

    Show off your greenest green!

    3/24: Inside Out/Backward Day

    The name speaks for itself; wear your clothing inside out and/or backward. 

    4/7: Autism Awareness

    Wear light blue to support people with Autism.

    4/14: Mismatched Day

    Wear clothing that doesn't go together (ie: stripes on top, polka dots on bottom, etc.)

    4/21: Earth Day

    Tomorrow is the day we honor Earth; wear GREEN and BLUE.

    4/28: Career Day

    Dress up as your future career/profession. 

    5/5: Superhero Day

    Are you a DC or Marvel fan - wear clothing that represents your favorite superhero. 

    5/12: Disney Day

    Wear any Disney gear, including Marvel, Star Wars, Winnie the Pooh, or Pixar to name a few!

    5/19: Crazy Hat Day

    Decorate your favorite hat with all sorts of embellishments to look a little CRAZY!

    5/26: Wacky Sock Day

    Insane patterns, mix and match, etc.

    6/2: Celebrate America

    Wear red, white, and blue. 

    6/9: Holiday Craze

    Dress up to represent your favorite holiday.

    6/16: Shine Bright Like a Diamond

    Wear bright or neon colors.

    6/23: Tropical Day

    Get ready for the warm weather by sporting sunglasses and tropical themed/Hawaiian patterns. 

     

     

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  • Chancellor's Zoom Meeting 4/22/21

    Please join Chancellor Porter via zoom for a discussion regarding the transition to 3-feet physical distancing protocols in 3-K, pre-K, D75 elementary, and elementary classrooms across the city.

    Join Zoom Meeting from 6pm-7pm on 4/22/21

    https://us02web.zoom.us/j/9687205512?pwd=NkZqTDRXUjVaTFRxR1Fpcy9hcVhRdz09

    Meeting ID: 968 720 5512

    Passcode: 638083

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  • DOE Family Update April 20, 2021

    DOE Family Update April 20, 2021

    Contents

    • Senior Transition Kickoff Begins April 19
    • Summer Rising Registration Begins April 26 • CCEC Voting Begins May 1

    Senior Transition Kickoff

    Calling all families of high school seniors!

    From Monday, April 19 through Friday, April 30, seniors and their families can attend a series of on-line events that will help them get started on next steps for life after graduation. The event topics include:

    • Financial aid workshops in 10 languages

    • Preparing for what to expect after graduation

    • Ways to use summer months to prepare for postsecondary transition

    • Fall 2021 supports available and how to access them

    • Text alerts about important reminders and next steps

      Learn more about the Senior Transition Kickoff at bit.ly/SeniorTransitionKickoff21

      Summer Rising

      Summer is about to get a whole lot more exciting for students!

      Beginning on Monday, April 26, New York City families can start signing up for Summer Rising, the City’s free summer program for any child in grades K–12 who wants to participate.

      Summer Rising combines the strength of the NYC Department of Education’s academics with the NYC Department of Youth and Community Development’s school-based enrichment programming to help create bridges back to school this fall. And it gives parents peace of mind as they return to work.

      Summer Rising is available in every neighborhood. Programs for students in grades K-8 will be full day, in-person experiences that will be run by local school leaders and trusted community-based organizations in safe and supportive environments. Each program will offer academic support, arts, and recreation, and staff members will be prepared to respond to students’ social and emotional

    needs. Summer Rising programs will also offer students local field trips to parks, pools, and other enriching outdoor venues that are educational and in accordance with State health and safety guidelines.

    All Summer Rising programs will follow rigorous health and safety protocols, including social distancing and mask wearing, and every location will have access to testing, nursing support, and a telehealth call center. In addition, breakfast, lunch, and a snack will be served to each student.

    For more information about Summer Rising, visit schools.nyc.gov/summer. To register beginning on April 26, visit discoverdycd.dycdconnect.nyc.

    Family and Community Empowerment

    Voting for City and Community Education Councils begins in one week!

    For the first time, every parent or guardian of a New York City public school student now has the opportunity to vote for their Education Council representatives!

    City and Community Education Councils (CCECs) serve as the voice of our families, offering important advice to the Chancellor and the NYC Department of Education. Voting begins
    on Saturday, May 1 and ends on Tuesday, May 11.

    To vote, you just need an NYC Schools Account (mystudent.nyc) that has all of your students registered. Visit schools.nyc.gov/NYCSA to learn more about the NYC Schools Account. If you do not have an NYC Schools Account, or need help registering your children to your existing account, please contact your school’s Parent Coordinator for assistance.

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  • Chancellor Porter 4/20/21 letter

    Dear Families,

    Last year, a police officer put his knee on George Floyd’s neck for nine minutes and twenty-nine seconds, but to me, it felt like an eternity.

    I felt pain and rage, deep in my bones. It wasn’t a new feeling. I have felt that many times in my life, as a Black woman, sister, daughter, and mother to Black children—and as an educator who has served children of color in this city for more than 20 years.

    That pain, rage, and fear has been present throughout the trial of the officer who killed George Floyd. I feel like I have been watching George Floyd die again and again, renewing the tragedy each time, as the jury and the nation have confronted what happened in the pursuit of justice for Mr. Floyd—and the family who is forced to go on without him.

    And now, the first step toward justice has been served.

    For me as a Black woman, for my brothers, for my mother and aunts who lost their brother to police violence, getting to justice is so important.

    For our Black and brown children to know that they matter, the accountability this verdict represents is so important.

    In a world that too often tells them otherwise, accountability in this moment tells the Black and brown children in our schools that their lives matter, and lifts up the importance of their futures.

    This is what anchors the work we do in schools every day—why we are so focused on creating welcoming, loving environments for all our children. We want to make sure that each child doesn’t just hear, but feels that they are important. We want them to feel that their teachers and school community value their past and present experiences, as well as their dreams for the future.

    For more than 20 years, I have experienced the sensitivity and wisdom of children—they know what’s going on, even those who may not be able to put it into words. They can feel the energy of the world around them. So we are making sure our schools are safe spaces for students to share their feelings. Every school is receiving resources to help facilitate open conversations and ensure our children have their questions heard.

    We also have mental health support in place for our students, teachers and staff to help grapple with any feelings that emerge. Because while the individual who took George Floyd’s life will be held accountable, we recognize that systemic racism, and the violence it fuels, is still creating tragedy and inequality across our country every single day. We are all part of the work to undo this harm and reach true justice.

    As you take care of yourselves and your loved ones the best you can, know that we are here in your corner, affirming the importance of our children’s future, each and every day. And that will never change.

    In partnership,

    Meisha Porter

    New York City Schools Chancellor

    April 20, 2021

     
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  • State Testing 2020-2021

    *****Please Note:
    -Any student who does not participate in the 2021 NYS ELA, Math, or Science exams will not be penalized.

    ****Please note:
    -Any family who wants their child to participate in testing must complete this survey. If you DO NOT want your child to participate in testing, NO FURTHER ACTION IS NEEDED (regardless of whether your child is a 100% remote student or if your child in an in-person student)

    ****Please Note:
    -If you have multiple children in Grades 3-8, please complete a SEPARATE Google Form for each child.

    This year, many of our students are learning remotely, but the New York State Education Department (NYSED) has required that exams must still take place in-person in the school building. It will not be possible to administer state exams remotely. Therefore, we are contacting you to determine if you would like your child to participate in this year’s State exams. It is very important you let us know if you would like your student to participate in this year’s State exams so that we can prepare and create a testing schedule that ensures the health and safety of all our students. Please read on for more information about this year’s exams.

    This year, the ELA and Mathematics exams for grades 3 through 8 will be multiple choice only. The tests are untimed, but most students will complete the tests in 55 to 90 minutes.

    Students receiving in-person instruction who do not take the exam will continue their instructional program, as will fully remote students.

    If you would like your child to participate in this year’s State exams, please notify us by completing the Google Form on the calendar by 5pm on Monday, April 12, 2021. If you do not wish to have your child test you do not have to take any further action. If we do not hear back from you by 5pm on April 12th, your child will not participate in state testing.

     

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  • DOE Family Update April 8, 2021

    DOE Family Update April 8, 2021

    Contents

    • All families: Last day to opt-in to in-person learning extended to Friday, April 9

    • Families applying to Gifted & Talented kindergarten programs: Application deadline is Friday, April 9

    • Families applying to pre-K: Application deadline extended to Monday, April 19

    • Families with children in grades 3–8: New York State Exam update

      Important Deadlines

      Spring Opt-in Deadline Extended to Friday, April 9

      If your child is currently learning remotely every day, they have one final opportunity to opt in to learning in person in the school building at least part of the week. The deadline to submit your request to transition to blended learning for the rest of this school year has been extended to Friday, April 9. How to opt-in to blended learning:

    • Online: visit the Learning Preference Survey
      at nycenet.edu/surveys/learningpreference to select blended learning for your child.

    • By phone: Call 311 to submit your learning preference change.

      G&T Kindergarten Application Deadline is Friday, April 9

      The application for kindergarten Gifted & Talented (G&T) programs is now open, and the deadline to apply is April 9. Interested families with children born in 2016 can apply one of three ways:

    • Online at MySchools.nyc

    • Through a Family Welcome Center—visit schools.nyc.gov/fwc to learn more.

    • By phone at 718-935-2009—you can also call us with any questions.

    Pre-K Application Deadline Extended to Monday, April 19

    Now you have more time to explore your child’s pre-K options! The pre-K application deadline for children born in 2017 has been extended to April 19. Apply online at MySchools.nyc or by phone at 718-935-2009—you can also call us with any questions. Learn more at nyc.gov/PreK.

    Tests and Assessments

    New York State Exams

    New York State Exams begin later this month. This year, the New York State Education Department has determined that English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics exams for grades 3 through 8, and Science exams for grades 4 and 8, will only be administered in person in your child’s school building. No remote option will be available.

    If you would like your child to participate in this year’s State exams, please notify your school. If you do not wish to have your child take State exams, you do not have to take any further action.

    The exams will be administered within the following dates:
    • English Language Arts (ELA) for grades 3 through 8: April 19–29
    • Mathematics for grades 3 through 8: May 3–14. Testing will not occur on May 13, when schools are closed for Eid Al-Fitr.

    • Science for grades 4 and 8: June 7–11

    Your child’s school will be communicating with more details about the testing process and deadlines. Learn more at schools.nyc.gov/testing.

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  • Letter from Chancellor Porter March 19, 2021

    Dear Families,

    This was my first week as your new Chancellor, and I couldn’t be more excited to take on this role. Not only because I am a New Yorker born and bred, but because education is in my blood. Both my mom and auntie were teachers and I became a New York City public school English teacher because of them, and the amazing educators I had as a student myself growing up in Queens.

    Since I started at the DOE 21 years ago, I have also worked as an assistant principal, and then principal. More recently, I served our school communities as a superintendent and Bronx executive superintendent.

    And now it is my honor and privilege to lead our schools citywide. I have spent much of this week seeing our brilliant students and educators from every borough in action, in-person and remotely. I saw pre-k students learn about the water cycle, joined sixth graders in learning ratios by mixing just the right ratio of food coloring into frosting, and joined seventh-graders in sharing special objects that reveal something about who we are. Despite all the changes and challenges we’ve faced this past year, our school communities are still joyful, vibrant places of learning.

    As I reflect on this week’s visits, I am also heartened by the beautiful diversity of our classrooms, communities, and our City as a whole. In our schools, “respect for all” is not just a slogan, but a way of life. We value every student, staff member, and family for who they are. We ensure everyone feels welcomed. This is at our very core.

    But the horrific anti-Asian hate crimes we’ve been seeing citywide and this week in Atlanta make it clear that we must work harder to end Justice and inclusivity have been pillars of my career as an educator.

    March 19, 2021

    systemic racism.

    As Chancellor, I promise to continue to advance equity and dismantle any biases in our school system. And I want to make it clear: there is no room for racism or discrimination of any kind at the Department of Education or in any of our schools. Just this week, we provided our educators with updated resources to combat hate crimes in our schools and provide our students with social and emotional supports. You can find resources for discussing

    racism and hate crimes with your children at schools.nyc.gov/togetherforjustice.

    Creating environments that encourage all students to be who they are will be on my mind on March 22, when all our public high schools will begin welcoming students back to in-person and blended learning. Like elementary and middle schools, as well as our District 75 programs, high schools will follow the strong practices we have established to help keep school communities healthy and safe. This includes weekly random testing of students and staff for COVID-19, physical distancing, masks, and nightly deep cleaning. In the meantime, I’m excited about this important milestone in the city’s recovery. And I’m proud to lead a school system that has set the standard for the nation in reopening efforts.

    This is such a hopeful and historic time for our schools and our city, and I want to thank you for all you have done to support our students and schools. In the coming weeks, there will be opportunities for us to meet and talk. I promise to hear and include your voices as we finish out this school year and plan for the next.

    Let’s go. Let’s do this. We’re ready.

    Sincerely,

    Meisha Porter

    New York City Schools Chancellor

     
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  • Gr 6 Cohort B and Mr. Hill's class --Positive Covid exposure

    3/18/2021

    Dear Member of P.S. 047 Chris Galas at 140 Beach 112 Street Community: 

    Your child has had close contact with an individual in our school community who has tested positive for COVID-19. According to health guidelines, your child must stay home for 10 days following the date of possible exposure and should not return to school until 3/28/2021.

    We know that this may be stressful, and we are here to support and guide you. You may be contacted by the NYC Test + Trace Corps (T2) with information and updates. Additionally, below you will find guidance that reflects the expertise of the NYC Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), the New York City Department of Education (DOE), and T2.

    Here is what to do now:

    Keep your child at home

    • Until 3/27/2021, your child can leave home only to visit a medical provider, to get a COVID-19 test, or in the event of an emergency. It is important that your child stay home, even if they do not feel sick, to prevent the spread of COVID-19.
    • Your child’s teacher will reach out about transitioning your child to fully remote learning for the duration of quarantine.
    • The NYC Test + Trace Corps partners with community-based organizations to connect New Yorkers in quarantine to resources like food, medicine, and health care. To connect with these resources, you can call 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319).

     

    Get tested

    • T2 strongly recommends you take your child for a COVID-19 test, whether or not they have symptoms. Testing is free at many sites and available regardless of immigration or insurance status. For information about testing, contact your child’s medical provider, call 311 or visit gov/covidtest.
    • Even if your child receives a negative test result, your child still must stay home for 10 days for monitoring and to ensure illness does not develop.

    Look out for symptoms

    • People with COVID-19 have reported a wide range of symptoms, including fever/chills, cough, difficulty breathing, and new loss of taste or smell. Most people with COVID-19 have mild to moderate symptoms and recover on their own. Some people have no symptoms at all. Less commonly, COVID-19 may lead to severe complications, hospitalization or death.
    • In rare cases, some children have developed multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C), a health condition associated with COVID-19 that can result in serious illness. Symptoms may include fever lasting several days, red or pink eyes, swollen hands and feet, rash, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, red cracked lips, or red bumpy tongue that looks like a strawberry.
    • Talk to your child’s medical provider if your child develops symptoms that could be from COVID-19. If your child does not have a medical provider, call 311.

    How can I stay updated?

    We will continue to closely follow directions from public health experts and proactively update you on any measures we are taking. To ensure we can reach you via text and email, please create a New York City Schools Account (NYCSA) as soon as possible by visiting schools.nyc.gov/nycsa.

    To help New Yorkers quarantine, the NYC Test + Trace Corps partners with community-based organizations to connect individuals to resources like food, medicine, and health care. To connect with these resources, you can call 1-212-COVID19 (212-268-4319).

    For additional information on COVID-19, visit schools.nyc.gov/coronavirus or call 311.  

    Sincerely,

    Heather Lorenz

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  • Letter from Chancellor Carranza February 26, 2021

    February 26, 2021

    Dear Families, 

    I hope you and your families are keeping safe and healthy. I’m writing today with some important news.

    After three years leading the DOE, I will be stepping down as Chancellor in March. I am full of mixed emotions to leave the DOE family.

    It has been the honor of my career to serve you, and help your child’s school and our whole system get closer to reaching its full potential. The strength and resilience of your children—our 1 million students—is awe-inspiring. It is what drove me through this unprecedented crisis, and it is what I take with me as I leave this post. The commitment and support you have shown to your children, and to your school communities, is incredible.

    Throughout my career, my guiding light has been the belief that public education is the most powerful equalizer for children. Public education anchors communities. Public education makes it possible for a child who is poor, or who lives in temporary housing, or—in my own case—who doesn’t speak English when they enter the public school system to develop their dreams, and then to chase them. Truly, it is public education that expresses the highest ideals of our democracy. My time in New York City has only strengthened this belief, as I have seen it play out time and again, in schools all across the boroughs.

    And together, we have seen proof. Our seniors kept breaking their own records as graduation rates and college enrollment kept rising higher, and the dropout rate kept getting lower.

    We also made true progress in dismantling the structures and policies that are the products of decades of entrenched racism in the city and country. We have worked to undo segregation and turn “equity” from an esoteric concept to a reality. Every school that no longer screens children for admission, and every district that uses DOE resources to create more space for low-income students, or English language learners, is making this mission real.

    We finally brought the mental health of our children into the spotlight and made it a major priority so that every child can feel welcomed, comfortable, and safe in their classroom and school community—especially now, when so many of our students are dealing with unforeseeable trauma.

    And, of course, at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic we transformed the nation’s largest school system overnight in order to protect the health of our students, staff, families, and communities. We have reinvented what it means to teach and learn in New York City public schools.

    All throughout, I have been proud to prioritize what’s best for kids over what’s politically popular. I have never been afraid of hard conversations. I have always believed that we need to set a high bar for every student—and then do what it takes to help them meet it.

    You, your children, and the dedicated staff who serve you deserve both continuity and courageous leadership from your next Chancellor. You need someone who knows firsthand the reality on the ground at our schools, and has the talent and leadership to finish the school year out strong and drive towards bringing every child back to buildings in September.

    That is why I am so proud that one of the most important leaders in this work will take on the privilege and responsibility of being your next Chancellor: Meisha Porter.

    Meisha is a 20-year veteran of New York City public schools, and currently serves as Bronx Executive Superintendent. In this role, she leads community school districts 7-12, covering the entire borough and its 361 schools and 235,000 students. She is a lifelong New Yorker and product of our public schools who first joined the Department of Education as a teacher at the Bronx School for Law, Government, and Justice—a school she helped conceive. After 18 years at the school, where she became Principal, Meisha spent three years as Superintendent of District 11, serving the Pelham Parkway, Eastchester, and Woodlawn neighborhoods of the Bronx. She has been Executive Superintendent since 2018, and in that time, the students of the Bronx have achieved significant academic gains, and schools have gotten stronger and stronger.

    Meisha is an unparalleled warrior for our students and our schools. She attended them, she taught in them, she led them, and now she will be Chancellor for ALL of them. None of the last several Chancellors—myself included—have been actively working with our schools, day in and day out, at the time they were appointed. Meisha will break the mold, bringing all her experience, past and present, to support you and your children. You will be hearing much more from Meisha soon, and I will be working with her over the next several weeks to ensure a smooth and productive transition.

    More than anything, I am proud to have served you, and so proud of the strides we have made. I don’t know what’s next for me, but I know I will take the spirit and richness of New York City with me anywhere and everywhere I go.

    It has been the honor of a lifetime to serve as your Chancellor. I am grateful to each and every one of you.

    Sincerely,

    Richard A. Carranza

    Chancellor New York City Department of Education

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  • COVID-19 Updates

    Please visit our COVID-19 Plan page to find all the critical information about how school name is changing the way we operate to reduce the risk of COVID infection. We are doing everything we can to make sure staff, students, and families are safe.

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Calendar & Upcoming Events

  • Cohort A is IN-PERSON

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  • SLT Meeting 3:30-5:30pm

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  • Cohort A is IN-PERSON

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  • Cohort B is IN-PERSON

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  • Cohort B is IN-PERSON

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